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2015 Creative Communities

2015 Creative Communities

BC Library Conference 2015

Friday Sessions

We are pleased to share the sessions taking place on Friday, May 22nd, 2015. Registration is now closed.  For additional information, visit our Conference Pricing and Registration FAQ pages. To see all of the events and sessions happening on Friday, download: Friday Conference at a Glance. Stream names follow session titles.

8:00 – 9:00 am 

Morning Meet & Greet
Generously Sponsored By: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

9:00 – 9:45 am

F1 – Books Behind Bars (Activism)

Location: Westminster 2

Session Description: Vancouver Island Regional Correctional Centre’s (VIRCC) Wilkinson Jail has been in the Victoria region for 100 years, but until two years ago the jail had no formal, sustained contact with the public library system. This session will describe the work Greater Victoria Public Library has done in that time, first, to build a 2000 volume book deposit at VIRCC that supplies 300 inmates with regular reading materials (annual budget: $0.00); and, second, to build a rudimentary book request service which, in its early incarnation, filled over 1000 requests in just over a year (annual budget : $0.00). This project has been a rich and rewarding professional experience, and has many lessons for those of us who attempt to give outreach service to underserved and marginalized populations in general. Among these lessons: how to create a service when the demand is there but the resources and the roadmap are not; how to persuade established institutions to take a chance when the risks are significant and the payoffs are unclear; how to ask for help from the right people at the right time; and how to embrace the notion that pretty good services realized are better than perfect services talked about.

Speaker Bio(s): Carl Cavanagh has been a librarian for 25 years, in Winnipeg, Montreal, Toronto, and Victoria. He is currently a Public Service Librarian at the Greater Victoria Public Library in Victoria BC where, among other things, he does library outreach for regional agencies working on homelessness, mental health, and poverty issues.

F2 – Can I actually Use It? Testing Open Textbooks for Accessibility (Evidence)

Location: Richmond C

Generously Sponsored By: UVic Libraries

Session Description: We will briefly describe the process of user testing open textbooks with post-secondary students who have print disabilities. We will focus on the lessons learned in this process and how this data fed into the creation of a toolkit on accessibility for open textbook authors. We will share our failures and reflect on how we would improve this process in the future. This project is a collaboration between BCcampus and CAPER-BC. BCcampus is a publicly funded organization that uses information technology to connect the expertise, programs, and resources of all B.C. post-secondary institutions under a collaborative service delivery framework. BCcampus is the lead organization for the open textbook project in BC. The Centre for Accessible Post-secondary Education Resources of British Columbia (CAPER-BC) provides accessible learning and teaching materials to students and instructors who cannot use conventional print because of disabilities. An open textbook is a textbook licensed under an open copyright license, and made available online to be freely used by students, teachers and members of the public. They are available for free as online versions, and as low-cost printed versions, should students opt for these.

Speaker Bio(s): Tara Robertson, Accessibility Librarian, CAPER-BC Tara manages alternate format production of textbooks and other course materials for post-secondary students with print disabilities. She also advocates for students with print disabilities and collaborates with other organizations to improve access to accessible materials.
Amanda Coolidge, Manager, Open Education, BCcampus Amanda supports the development and sharing of open educational resources in BC. She project manages the adoption, adaptation, and creation of OER and provides technical and instructional design support for the B.C. Open Textbook Project.

F3 – “Open Knowledge”: A MOOCish Experiment in Creative Communities and Library Education (Place)

Location: Cedarbridge

Generously Sponsored By: SFU Library

Session Description: In the fall of 2014, five instructors from five universities in Canada, the United States, Mexico, and Ghana came together with over 50,000 students from around to world to create a new learning experience on the themes of openness and participation, including modules on open education, open access, participatory culture, and more. “Open Knowledge: Changing the Global Course of Learning” is a MOOC — a massive, open, online course, freely available to anyone with an internet connection and a desire to learn with others. In addition to the non-credit, MOOC participation, five cohorts of credit students joined the course, including iSchool students from UBC, Publishing students from SFU, Education students from Stanford University, Business students from Fordham University, and Political & Social Science students from the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. Students engaged not only in the critical ideas within the themes of the course, but also developed their digital literacy skills, learning to use a variety of social media and digital creation tools to connect with one another (as well as with experts in the field) and complete “hands-on” activities to find, identify, evaluate, use, and remix openly licensed content from the web, including text, images, audio, and video files. In creating the course, our goal was to facilitate a dialogue on the critical role of active, engaged participation within communities, and the importance of openness to allow for this to develop in meaningful, empowering ways. Libraries are a key platform for transformative participation, and librarians and library staff require new knowledge and new skills to make this a success. Join us for a discussion of learning, connecting, participation, library education, and upcoming open learning opportunities.

Speaker Bio(s): Kevin Stranack Learning Coordinator, Public Knowledge Project, Simon Fraser University Library Kevin works with the Simon Fraser University Library’s Public Knowledge Project, leading its community services and learning initiatives. Kevin has a Master of Library and Information Studies from UBC and a Master of Adult Education from the University of Regina. He serves as an adjunct faculty member at the University of British Columbia’s iSchool and at Simon Fraser University’s Publishing Program. Kevin is also a member of the international advisory board of the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).
Lauren Maggio Director of Research and Instruction, Stanford University School of Medicine Lauren is the Director of Research and Instruction at Stanford University’s medical library. Lauren has a Master of Science in Library and Information Science from Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science and a Master of Arts in Children’s Literature from the University of British Columbia School of Library and Information Science. Lauren is currently completing her PhD in Health Professions Education in a joint program at the University of California, San Francisco and the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. Her research focuses on effectively connecting people with information through the design of information literacy education and facilitating public access to knowledge.

Victoria Lam is a Master of Library & Information Studies Student, iSchool, University of British Columbia Victoria holds a Masters of Arts from the University of Manchester, and is currently working to attain her Master of Library Information Science from the School of Library, Information and Archival Studies at the University of British Columbia.

F4 – Tiny Stories, Big Impact (Work)

Location: Westminster 3

Generously Sponsored By: Emerald Group Publishing

Session Description: In 2013 the Powell River Public Library launched a microfiction contest based on the book 420 Characters by author and artist Lou Beach. The challenge: to pack vivid descriptions, original characters and surprising plot twists into a narrative small enough to fit in a Facebook status update. The result: a literal deluge of story submissions. Some were fictional, others not. They were written by seniors, teens, and everyone in-between. The Library brought the contest back in 2014 by popular demand. This session is all about the nuts and bolts of running a successful microfiction contest. You’ll get a practical breakdown for how to run your own contest – from advertising to judging to hosting a reading to sharing the results online. You’ll also pick up some tips on how to find strong visuals, harness social media teasers, and respond to creative spin offs and opportunities as they arise. Using tiny stories as an example, we’ll discuss creative programs as a form activism, advocacy and the key to lifelong learning.

Speaker Bio(s): Sonia Zagwyn began working in libraries when she was 14 ¾ years old and never really stopped. Between studies in visual arts and creative writing she worked in three B.C. library systems, completing an MFA in Creative Writing at UBC in 2011. Her projects are often interdisciplinary, from graphic fiction to musical collaborations. Her poetry has appeared in cross-genre magazines such as Versal and Front. She is currently writing a circus libretto and performs her songs in the band Calliope and the Monday Man. She is the Teen Services Coordinator at the Powell River Public Library.

F5 – In Conversation with Penny Ballem (Activism)

Location: Elmbridge

Session Description: Public libraries play an important role in support of healthy and sustainable communities. As knowledge and social infrastructure, public libraries are positioned to not only meet the lifelong learning needs of their residents, but also provide platforms for community engagement and dialogue. In Vancouver, the relationship between the Library and the City has evolved over recent years, with the Library taking on an increased role in supporting broader City priorities

Speaker Bio(s): Penny J. Ballem, MSc, MD, FRCP, City Manager, City of Vancouver
Dr. Ballem joined the City of Vancouver in December 2008 as the City Manager. Dr Ballem is a physician who came to the City from a long and diverse career in the health sector as a senior administrator, practitioner, educator and researcher. Dr. Ballem joined the City of Vancouver in December 2008 as the City Manager. Dr Ballem is a physician who came to the City from a long and diverse career in the health sector as a senior administrator, practitioner, educator and researcher.

F6 – Between Visual Arts and English: The Digital Fabrication Lab at UVic (Place)

Location: Westminster 1

Generously Sponsored By: Springer

Session Description: A quick scan of digital fabrication research across the academy suggests that computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) is most common in mechanical engineering, architecture, design, and urban planning departments (Goertz and Morgan 2014). For two examples among many, consider Taubman College’s Digital Fab Lab at the University of Michigan and the John H. Daniels Faculty Fab Lab at the University of Toronto. Inspired by Neil Gershenfeld’s groundbreaking work at MIT, digital fabrication appeals to practitioners in these fields because it tightens the loop between model and prototype, code and material, concept and object. It also allows those practitioners to better anticipate surprises, reduce error and waste, and rapidly test their ideas before projects are delivered for small- or large-batch production. But, aside from a few recent publications (e.g., Elliott et al. 2012 and Kee 2014), very little attention has been paid to the relevance of CAM techniques to scholarly communication in the arts and humanities. This talk will unpack that relevance, with a focus on a new space at the University of Victoria: the Digital Fabrication Lab (a collaboration between Visual Arts and English).

Speaker Bio(s): Jentery Sayers is Assistant Professor of English, as well as Director of the Maker Lab in the Humanities, at the University of Victoria. His work has appeared in American Literature; e-Media Studies; Digital Studies/Le champ numérique; The Victorian Review; New American Notes Online; Literature Compass; Computers and Composition Online; International Journal of Learning and Media; Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy; and Computational Culture, among others. He is currently working on four books: The Digging Condition (U. of Michigan P.), the Routledge Companion to Media Studies and Digital Humanities (ed., Routledge), Making Humanities Matter (ed., U. of Minnesota P.), and Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities (ed., with Davis, Gold, and Harris, Modern Language Association Books).

9:45 – 10:00 am

Caffeine Fix Coffee Break
Generously Sponsored By: Gale, Cengage Learning 

Location: Westminster Foyer

10:00 – 11:15 am

F7 – Create & Learn: Empowering Community Content Creators (Place)

Location: Cedarbridge

Session Description: Providing a platform for community created content has become a focus for Richmond Public Library to both ensure that our community has a way to share their creative and intellectual work, and to ensure that information and content from our programming remains accessible long after the actual programs themselves have completed. To achieve this, RPL has introduced a new digital platform called Create & Learn. This session will go over why Richmond decided to use the Active Textbooks system to build Create & Learn, and demonstrate how this new tool works. We will provide examples of Create & Learn documents, and ways in which it has been used at Richmond Public Library – not only as a tool for the public, but also for staff. An overview of the successes, challenges, and future of Create & Learn will also be discussed, as the possibilities of what our community will create and share are endless!

Speaker Bio(s): Kat Lucas – Coordinator, eServices, Richmond Public Library Kat has been with Richmond Public Library since 2007. For the past four years in her position as Coordinator, eServices, Kat has been managing a wide variety of digital collections and services, including eBooks and other online resources, web development, and digital literacy programming. She particularly enjoys the troubleshooting and instructional portions of her current position.

Susan Walters – Deputy Chief Librarian, Richmond Public Library. Susan Walters has been the Deputy Chief Librarian at Richmond Public Library since 2012. Over the past ten years Susan has been instrumental in fostering a culture of community engagement at Richmond Public library. As an outcome of our Public Consultation process, she has been at the forefront of leading staff in the implementation of several new community collaborative initiatives and services.

Theresa de Sousa – Student Resources Librarian, Richmond Public Library. Theresa has worked in public libraries for almost 10 years, and in her current position at Richmond Public Library for the last four years. Theresa is also a member of the BCLA Readers’ Advisory Interest Group.

Tiffinie Green – Director of Product Development, Evident Point Software Corp. Tiffinie Green is Director of Product Development at Evident Point Software and started with the company at the beginning of 2015. Prior to joining Evident Point, Tiffinie was a Technology Transfer Officer at the University of British Columbia and helped Faculty and Graduate Students commercialize research efforts. Tiffinie is an avid consumer of all types of media and her family deeply appreciates the public library system as a major factor in maintaining the family budget.

F8 – Rethinking Screentime: Apps, Parents, and Families (Evidence)

Location: Westminster 3

Generously Sponsored By: Library Services Centre

Session Description: Evidence-based library practice is not so simple when the research is just emerging. For years we’ve advised families to limit children’s screen time, based on guidelines rooted in television research. Today’s touchscreen devices provide very different opportunities for families. These devices are so new, we don’t yet have a body of research to support best practices, leaving families with conflicting messages about appropriate media use. At VPL, we developed programs about using touchscreen apps to support children in developing early literacy skills, and in creating, interacting, and learning. Apps for Your Little Ones and Apps for Your School-Age Kid are programs for parents and caregivers focusing on how to use apps. Instead of a list of recommended apps, we walk parents through the practical aspects of sharing or encouraging positive app use. We talk about apps in the context of family activities – how they can be tools for early literacy and facilitate creativity. We show how apps can have a role in talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing with children, and how apps can give older children opportunities to create, socialise, and discover. We will describe the rational, content, and practical aspects of these programs, our experiences delivering them to different communities, and the lessons we learned. We will demo some of the apps we explored with our parents. We will give you the materials to take and adapt this program for your community. Let’s look beyond outdated media guidelines and ask how our families are really using technology.

Speaker Bio(s): Lindsey Krabbenhoft is an auxiliary Children’s Librarian at the Vancouver Public Library. She also runs a storytime YouTube channel and blog called Jbrary with her friend Dana. She tweets on the regular about librarianship, apps, and her 3-year-old niece at @lmkrabbenhoft. Francesca de Freitas is a Children’s Librarian at the Vancouver Public Library. As a librarian, mother to two experiments in perpetual motion, and an escaped web developer, Francesca delights in sharing the wondrous world of stories available to children – in all its forms – including electronic ones.

F9 – Beyond Academic Liaison: Realizing the Academic Librarian as Scholar Practitioner (Work)

Location: Westminster 2

Generously Sponsored By: Gibson Library Connections Inc

Session Description: The liaison librarian model is toast. Worse, it was wrong to begin with. It reinforces the academic librarian as service provider rather than academic partner. Academic librarians are “scholar practitioners.” Both aspects of the role are critical to full participation in the academy. However, librarians and libraries have been slow to fully develop our capacity as researchers and teachers, and to establish our libraries as research incubators. Advancing the research and teaching agenda of librarians requires a clear vision of our role, capacity building to enable new skills, and a new perspective on how research (and research culture) can become part of our professional lives. In a similar way, academic libraries need to think of themselves as research incubators with specific research mandates. Every library should have a strategic research plan to leverage the capacities of its librarians, enabling a critical mass to address some of the key research questions of our field. Enabling the scholar practitioner requires rethinking our professional role and reframing the mandate of the academic library. Perhaps the best way to realize the vision of the scholar practitioner is to loosen our ties to the library and branch out as our own academic department.

Speaker Bio(s): Michael Ridley a librarian at the University of Guelph and an instructor in Guelph’s First Year Seminar Program. He is the former Chief Information Officer (CIO) and Chief Librarian at Guelph. Ridley has served in various executive capacities for CLA, OLA, CAIS, CRKN, and CARL. He is completing a three year term as an elected faculty representative on the Board of Governors at Guelph. Mike tweets as @mridley and blogs on www.MichaelRidley.ca. He can be reached at mridley@uoguelph.ca

F10 – EPL 2014 Library of the Year: Leading Change and Transforming Culture (Work)

Location: Elmbridge

Generously Sponsored By: Gibson Library Connections Inc

Session Description: Pilar Martinez will talk about some of the factors that led to Edmonton Public Library winning Library Journal/Gale Cengage 2014 Library of the Year. She will highlight challenges that instigated a shift in organizational culture, review successes and how those successes were achieved, as well as address challenges and learning opportunities along the way. The session will conclude with a summary of future plans for the Edmonton Public Library and what excites her in her work.

Speaker Bio(s): Pilar Martinez is the Deputy CEO at the Edmonton Public Library where she is responsible for leading Branch Services, Marketing & Fund Development, Collections & IT and Research & Assessment. Pilar has a broad base of experience in library leadership including: advocacy, collective bargaining, strategic and business planning, recruitment and change leadership. She holds a MLIS from the University of Alberta and a Bachelor of Arts with Honours in English from Acadia University. Pilar was the main champion and leader behind the implementation of EPL’s community-led service framework and the Leading From Any Position staff development initiative. In 2012, Pilar was honoured with the Ken Haycock Award for Promoting Librarianship. Married with two teen-aged boys who bring much joy (mostly), Pilar believes that chocolate solves everything.

F11 – Doing politics differently: Tools for engagement learned from the non-profit sector (Activism)

Location: Westminster 1

Session Description: David Eby will present a summary of several strategies for community engagement learned during his time working with non-profit organizations that he has deployed in his new role as an elected official. Group discussion to share strategies on community engagement will be encouraged with an emphasis on participants leaving with a couple practical ideas they can use to increase their impact in their local community.

Speaker Bio(s): David Eby is the provincial government representative for the constituency of Vancouver-Point Grey, which includes UBC, Point Grey and Kitsilano. David also serves as the New Democrat Official Opposition spokesperson for Tourism, Housing, Gambling, the BC Pavilion Corporation (BC Place and the Convention Centre) and Liquor Policy. An award-winning human rights lawyer, David was the Executive Director of the B.C. Civil Liberties Association prior to his election in May of 2013. He has appeared at all levels of court in British Columbia, where he helped protect human rights, democratic rights, and the rights of the homeless and underhoused in Vancouver. He has been recognized twice in Vancouver Magazine’s Power 50 list. Currently, David works with Vancouver-Point Grey’s residents, librarians and businesses every day, advocating for their interests locally and provincially.

11:30 am – 12:15 pm

F12 – Get Real! Questionnaire Design, Administration, and Analysis in a Small-Town Community (Evidence)

Location: Westminster 3

Session Description: It’s become easier than ever to survey your library’s stakeholders; online survey tools such as Survey Monkey have made it possible for anyone to create and disseminate questionnaires, and more and more of the people we serve are online. Moreover, the ways in which libraries report to their stakeholders has shifted in recent years, from traditional metrics such as input and output statistics, to measures of effectiveness, i.e. outcomes and impact–further necessitating the use of qualitative research methods such as questionnaires. As the result, it’s more important than ever for library professionals to be proficient in survey design, administration, and analysis, so that we might strive towards the gold standard when conducting our research, and act confidently on the data that we collect. In this session, we’ll summarize and present the leading library assessment literature and review the best practices for survey design, distribution, and data analysis. We’ll then compare these to our recent experience at the Squamish Public Library, designing and administering the 2013 Community Input Survey, as a means to gather information about our users’ expectations, experiences, and values. Beyond just collecting these data, we’ll also talk about how we incorporated this information into our strategic plan, and the ways in which we’ve acted on this information to date.

Speaker Bio(s): Chelsea Jordan-Makely is the Public Services Librarian at Squamish Public Library and a firm believer that diligent, continual library assessment is essential to the success of any library system. She has worked in libraries in Tanzania, South Africa, the U.S. and Canada, and has led library research projects as a fellow at the Library Research Service and as a consultant for the Pacific University Library in Oregon. Chelsea earned her MLIS in 2012 from the University of Denver and was a recipient of the Librarian Education and Diversity Scholarship. Outside of Library Land, Chelsea enjoys mountain biking, yoga, cooking and baking, and snuggling with a lazy tabby cat named Stokely.
Hilary Bloom has been with the Squamish Public Library since 2002, first as a circulation desk staff member and later as children’s librarian and deputy director. After several years of auxiliary work for the library, she became the director of library services in January of 2014. Hilary was a tutor for the provincial Ministry of Education Community Librarian Training Program courses in children’s and youth services for six years, and has worked as an auxiliary librarian at Quest University Canada. She received a Master of Library and Information Studies from the University of British Columbia in 2005. Hilary’s most prestigious job title is that of “Mom” to her two young daughters.

F13 – Breaking Boundaries, Making Connections with Saskatchewan’s Aboriginal People (Activism)

Location: Elmbridge

Session Description: Saskatchewan libraries have undertaken numerous initiatives to build stronger relationships with First Nation and Metis people to ensure libraries are more inclusive and receptive to the diverse information needs of Aboriginal peoples. This session will highlight two provincial committees and Regina Public Library programs, resources, services and strategies that foster quality Aboriginal library services. Such strategies include consultations with Aboriginal organizations and communities, professional development related to Aboriginal awareness, creating a welcoming atmosphere and culturally relevant programming. Many programming initiatives support the development of Aboriginal culture and languages, i.e. Saskatchewan Aboriginal Storytelling project, a province-wide initiative held annually in February.

Speaker Bio(s): Wendy Sinclair has worked for Regina Public Library for the past 29 years. As Albert Library Branch Head, Wendy has participated on various boards and committees, at the local and provincial level, with the purpose of advocating library services for Aboriginal peoples.

F14 – Mind the Gap: a Team Approach to Developing More Student-Centered General Instruction (Work)

Location: Richmond C

Generously Sponsored By: Springer

Session Description: How do we bridge the gaps between: – general information literacy standards vs. specific classroom contexts – developing vs. delivering workshop content – what we (and faculty) think students need to know vs. what they think they need to know Join a team of library assistants and librarians for a lively and interactive discussion of ways we can work together to establish effective feedback loops to continually assess and improve our general library instruction programs.

Speaker Bio(s): Hope Power Hope is the Assistant Head of Information & Instruction as well as the Liaison Librarian for Education at SFU Burnaby. As a member of the library’s former Instruction Team, she assisted with revising and rebranding a series of introductory Discover Your Library workshops and liaised with other campus units to update and streamline an instruction program for IB secondary school students.
Dawn Smaill is a Library Assistant in the Information and Instruction Division at Simon Fraser University. She previously worked at the University of the Fraser Valley library. While completing her Library and Information Technology diploma at UFV, Dawn organized the annual Mock Interview Workshop and was actively involved with the library student association (LITSA) as the Social Media Coordinator. She finds it empowering to connect people with the information they seek and show them how they can develop their own research skills. Dawn also volunteers her social media skills for the Mission Community Archives and as Social Media Coordinator for LTAS.
Ashley Van Dijk is a Library Assistant within SFU Library’s Information and Instruction Division. She graduated in 2009 with her Library Technician diploma from UFV. She has been with SFU since January 2013, and is passionate about helping students with their research and information needs. Ashley is also an active member of BCLA, co-chairing the Vancouver section of LTAS and is the LTAS Chair.
Janis McKenzie (Discussion Facilitator) Janis is Head of Information and Instruction at the SFU Library. Even though she has mixed feelings about the term “information literacy” she is passionate about its importance, and about finding ways to make information literacy instruction more engaging for learners — inside and outside the formal workshop setting.
Rebecca Dowson (Discussion Facilitator) Rebecca is the Liaision Librarian for English and History at the SFU Library. In addition to her liaison work, Rebecca has collaborated with Library colleagues and SFU instructors on curriculum revision and assessment for several instruction programs, including Foundations of Academic Literacy and Fraser International College. Exploring new strategies to help researchers connect with information and develop their own information seeking skills continues to be one of the most enjoyable aspects of her position.

F15 – CUPE – Working In and For Libraries! (Activism)

Links to the Presentation: CUPE News and Slides

Session Description: This session will shine a light on the advocacy and activism of library workers in the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) over the past 51 years. Working in all sectors of the library community – post-secondary, public and K-12 – CUPE has been at the forefront of representing library workers locally, provincially and nationally. In British Columbia, CUPE represents 8,000 library workers in colleges, universities, elementary, middle and secondary schools and public libraries. CUPE BC’s Library Committee raises awareness of the work performed by library workers and supports political action, including lobbying B.C. MLAs for increased provincial funding for libraries and library services. At the federal level, the CUPE National Library Workers Committee lobbies federal politicians for literacy and reading rights to ensure that libraries and library services stay public and inclusive. Resolutions passed at CUPE and BC Federation of Labour conventions ensure that library issues form part of the strategic direction of the labour movement. This interactive session will highlight the story of a local library worker’s experience of being on the picket line. Panelists will review the mandate and the history of both the CUPE BC and CUPE National Library committees, including the important work of advocating for libraries in all sectors. Library resolutions will be presented in a mock convention and participants will have then have the opportunity to speak on the resolutions and talk about what happens once a resolution is passed on convention floor.

Speaker Bio(s): The CUPE BC Library Committee provides a forum for CUPE library workers in K-12, public and post-secondary libraries from all regions of the province. The Committee meets regularly to identify goals and strategies for protecting and promoting library services in British Columbia. In addition to advocacy and lobbying projects, the Committee hosts the CUPE BC Library Workers conferences and organizes library caucus meetings to gather and share information. Karen Ranalletta, Denise Parks and Zoe Magnus will be representing the CUPE BC Library Committee.

F16 – Looking Inwards and Out, New Professionals in Libraries (Work)

Location: Westminster 2

Generously Sponsored By: iSchool @ UBC

Session Description: Fluctuating between idealism and cynicism, those new to library work can be passionate about the profession – for better or for worse. Join a diverse and enthusiastic panel for a discussion of the issues, concerns, and dreams of those who are new to, and just entering the field. What does the profession look like to new professionals? What does “professional” mean to new professionals? How would they like to shape the library world, and how is the library world shaping them? Is it constraining them or allowing them to grow in unexpected ways, or both? What are the issues within librarianship, or that librarianship is concerned with, that are most important to those who have recently entered the field? This session promises a lively discussion covering topics from what advocacy should look like and how we define ourselves as professionals, to what we can do to help with literacies, open access and creativity in our communities and our workplaces

Speaker Bio(s): Sarah Felkar, Digital Access Librarian, West Vancouver Memorial Library Sarah is the Digital Access Librarian at the West Vancouver Memorial Library. Currently she is serving as a director at large for the British Columbia Library Association, and as the BC Library Coop’s Licensing Business Function Group Chair. She specializes in making technology happen to library projects, as well as digital literacy training for staff and patrons. Active on Twitter (@sarahfelkar), she is also interested in knitting, fantasy novels, and shiny gadgets.
Anna Ferri, Student; School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, UBC; ferri.annam@gmail.com Anna Ferri is a MLIS candidate with the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, UBC, and Student Librarian at West Vancouver Memorial Library. She is serving as the BCLA Board Student Representative, the Browser Editorial Board Student Representative and is a member of the BCLA Readers’ Advisory Interest Group. She is interested in library instruction practices especially with regards to technology and digital literacy, library services that support capacity building in our communities, and Readers’ Advisory practice and theory. Follow her on Twitter @annamferri.
Allison Trumble recently graduated from UBC with an MLIS. She works part-time at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia Institute of Technology, and North Vancouver District Public Library and is the Chair of BCLA’s Information Policy Committee. Her professional interests include pedagogy and instruction, informal learning, and all things infopolicy, especially relating to digital and democratic rights. Not-so-professional interests include plants, fungi, and the mystery of the cosmos. Find her on Twitter @atrumbled.
J Jack Unrau, Public Librarian, Librarianaut.com Justin works an information desk at a (small city’s) downtown library branch most days. He does his best work helping one person at a time, which he realizes is not the most efficient way to librarianize, but is a good way to keep your subversive ideas kind of on the down-low. He also makes librarianly radio, barely-animated videos, a tiny bit of bleep-bloop music and tries to teach library users to do the same. @jjackunrau

F17 – Goodbye Cyberspace. Hello Code/Space (Place)

Link to Presentation: Goodbye Cyberspace

Session Description: The world basks in the pale light of an ever-increasing number of glowing rectangles. Billions of lines of software code support their operations and sustain their function. Invisible telecommunications networks connect devices and people across space and time. It’s a wonder the whole thing works at all. Software and its increasingly pervasive physical presence in the world afford new ways of understanding, connecting, and participating. With these new ways comes the need to re-think and possibly re-configure our spaces, a force that is being acutely felt by libraries large and small. How has this growing presence of networks and computing changed our concepts of space and place? Given our contemporary technological conditions are ideas like “cyberspace” and “online space” still relevant and productive as guiding metaphors for the design of library services and the fulfillment of libraries’ civic mandate? In this talk, Gordon Ross will introduce models and theories to help librarians understand the relationship between software, space, and our interactions afforded through their presence.

Speaker Bio(s): Gordon Ross is Vice President of OpenRoad, an award-winning Vancouver-based digital experience design firm. His career has spanned 20 years of designing and developing websites, intranets, and web applications for organizations like the City of Vancouver, BC Hydro, Courthouse Libraries BC, ICBC, Ministry of Justice, and the Vancouver Public Library. He is a Trustee of the Vancouver Public Library and was a member of the External Advisory Committee for the City of Vancouver’s Digital Strategy. He helps coordinate and sponsor the Vancouver User Experience Group, a local design meetup. He holds a degree in Communication from SFU.

12:15 – 1:30 pm

Lunch On Your Own

Richmond Public Library Tour – Visit the Off Site Events page for more details. Limited to 20 participants and must sign up during conference registration on Eventbrite.

1:30 – 2:45 pm

F18 – Learning beyond the School: Libraries and Learning Transformation (Evidence)

Location: Cedarbridge

Session Description: BC’s Education Plan is based on a simple vision: Capable young people thriving in a rapidly changing world. To achieve this, we need an education system that better engages students in their own learning and that fosters the skills and competencies they will need to succeed.

Join Rod Allan, formerly the Superintendent for Learning (Ministry of Education), and now the Superintendent of Schools, SD 79 Cowichan Valley, for a discussion of education transformation and personalized learning in BC. In a more personalized world where more learning happens outside of a standard K-12 classroom, what are the opportunities and challenges for communities and libraries? Paige MacFarlane, Assistant Deputy Minister will be facilitating the session. There will be time for Q & A.

Speaker Bio(s): Rod Allen is the Superintendent of Schools, SD 79 Cowichan Valley. As the most recent Superintendent of Learning, with the BC Ministry of Education, Rod has a key leadership role in British Columbia’s transformation to personalized learning. Prior to joining government he was a Superintendent for School District 54 (Bulkley Valley). Rod has taught at most grade levels in British Columbia, where he advanced through school and district leadership positions. In his new role, Rod will continue to champion the work already underway and help shift these concepts into practice.

F19 – Public Engagement for Public Libraries – Make it Fun, Make it Count (Evidence)

May 21st – We are sorry to report that Emory Davidge has had to withdraw from presenting this session at the BC Library Conference due to illness. The Conference Planning Committee joins Emory Davidge in apologizing to all who registered for this session. We will certainly ask Emory back next year!

F20 – Academic Librarians and OER: Access, Advocacy, and Activism (Activism)

Location: Westminster 1

Generously Sponsored By: SFU Library

Session Description: We’ve all read or heard the stories – “Libraries cancel large academic journal packages due to price increases”. “Students muster to demand Open Textbook options across Canadian Universities”. “Scholarly publishing revolution breakthroughs!” Never before has the Open Education movement been more important in academia. Local institutions are beginning to devote more resources towards it, yet the advocacy role that libraries and librarians can play is still unclear to many. Join members of the BCOER (British Columbia Open Educational Resources) and a BC Open Textbook Faculty Fellow as they discuss how the open movement is changing education, how it can alter the scholarly publishing paradigm, and why librarians should care. A panel of two librarians and one faculty member actively teaching using open resources will discuss open material within the context of the current landscape, finding and promoting open resources to extend collections, and how open access licensing works for the content creators and users. This session will be a good basic introduction to open access and open educational resources – what they are, how they work, how to get started using them, and how libraries can play a role in the open movement. But it will go further and also look at how librarians can collaborate and contribute to join in the impassioned discussion about OERs in the broader educational community.

Speaker Bio(s): Caroline Daniels, Kwantlen Polytechnic University Caroline is the Systems, Web and Interlibrary Loans librarian at Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU) and a member of BCOER. KPU’s president is a long time proponent of Open Education and has secured KPU as a member of OERu. Many of the KPU faculty have demonstrated great uptake with the Open Textbook movement through BCcampus. With this type of backdrop, her interest in OER has peaked!
Brenda Smith, Thompson Rivers University Brenda is the Distance and Document Delivery Librarian at Thompson Rivers University (TRU) and a member of the BCOER. For the past year, she has been working with faculty who are creating open textbooks and using OERs in their courses. TRU is active with BCcampus’ Open Textbook initiative and is a founding partner in the Open Educational Resources University (OERu). TRU actively promotes using OERs in face-to-face and open learning (distance) courses.
Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani, Kwantlen Polytechnic University Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani teaches psychology at Kwantlen Polytechnic University where he conducts research in political psychology, social cognition, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. He is a Faculty Fellow with the BC Open Textbook Project and has revised two open textbooks for Research Methods in Psychology and Social Psychology. He is the Director of the Social & Political Cognition Lab at Kwantlen, the Director of Research, Resources, and Special Initiatives with the Society for the Teaching of Psychology’s (STP) Early Career Psychologists Committee, and a member of STP’s Presidential Task Force on Undergraduate Skills Assessment. Online: thatpsychprof.com or @thatpsychprof.

F21 – Multiple Communities, Multiple Literacies: Exploring Users’ Experiences of Library Spaces at Vancouver Island University (Place)

Location: Westminster 3

Generously Sponsored By: SFU Library

Session Description: Literacies are developed and enacted all around us in academic and public libraries. Our spaces are ‘hacked’ by our user communities to meet distinctly non-traditional library needs just as much as they are used to serve traditional informational purposes: these are findings from a space study done at Vancouver Island University Library. The presenters conducted a ‘space sweep’—dividing their library’s publicly accessible spaces into 43 different zones and then tracking in each zone numbers of users working individually or in groups. As well, noise levels were recorded in certain zones with a mobile phone decibel reader app. The second part of the study involved unobtrusive observation of users in select library spaces and interviewing users about what they typically did during library visits. This presentation is intended to foster discussion amongst BC public and academic librarians about how our user communities creatively transform library spaces as well as provide ideas for improving our understanding of library users’ experiences.

Speaker Bio(s): Cameron Hoffman is Vancouver Island University’s Learning Services Librarian. He coordinates information literacy initiatives and teaches first-year English and ESL information literacy classes. He has worked in libraries in Alberta and Quebec as well as in BC. He also teaches sessionally with the MLIS program at The University of Western Ontario.
Meg Ecclestone is the Learning Commons Librarian at Vancouver Island University, where she works to develop the library’s learning commons spaces and services. She is a relative newcomer to British Columbia, having previously worked at York University and the University of Ottawa in the areas of liaison and information literacy. You can find her on Twitter, via @mjecclestone.
Kathleen Reed is the Assessment and Data Librarian at Vancouver Island University. She’s married to a wonderful public librarian, so she spends a lot of time comparing experiences at academic and public libraries. You can reach her at kathleen.reed@viu.ca or @kathleenreed.

F22 – Oh Glorious Failures! Lightning Talks on How to Succeed Through Failure (Work)

Location: Elmbridge

Session Description: Conference sessions are often about putting our best foot forward, about sharing what went well, and about glossing over what didn’t work out. This session aims to turn things around by focusing on those times when we tried something new, or different, or innovative and, well, it didn’t quite work. By talking openly about failures and what we learned from them, we aim to explore ways to encourage innovation among staff, and to demonstrate what it means to build a creative institution that’s responsive to the needs of community members and other stakeholders. If failure is the only certainty in uncertain times, then it’s time to take back the word ʺfailureʺ and make it part of our success. Accepting failure as a tool for growth can be a successful method to give staff a safe way to take risks and innovate. During the session, staff from a variety of libraries (public, academic, special) will give lightning talks on their ʺglorious failuresʺ, how they overcame them (if they did) and share any insights gained. The goal of the session will be to transform this F-word, so attendees can unlearn the fear of failure and explore how to fail successfully. Through others’ stories of failure we will not only learn ways to avoid repeating mistakes, but how to effectively get it wrong the first time.

Speaker Bio(s): Beth Davies, Vancouver Public Library Beth Davies is a Manager of Neighbourhood Services at the Vancouver Public Library. She is passionate about how libraries can engage with all members of their communities, and firmly believes that failure is a big part of community engagement.
Gordon Ross is Vice President of OpenRoad, an award-winning Vancouver-based digital experience design firm. His career has spanned 20 years of designing and developing websites, intranets, and web applications for organizations like the City of Vancouver, BC Hydro, Courthouse Libraries BC, ICBC, Ministry of Justice, and the Vancouver Public Library. He is a Trustee of the Vancouver Public Library and was a member of the External Advisory Committee for the City of Vancouver’s Digital Strategy. He helps coordinate and sponsor the Vancouver User Experience Group, a local design meetup. He holds a degree in Communication from SFU.
J Jack Unrau is a Public Librarian who works on the information desk at a (small city’s) downtown library branch most days. He does his best work helping one person at a time, which he realizes is not the most efficient way to librarianize, but is a good way to keep your subversive ideas kind of on the down-low. He also makes librarianly radio, barely-animated videos, a tiny bit of bleep-bloop music and tries to teach library users to do the same. Librarianaut.com @jjackunrau
Pilar Martinez is the Deputy CEO at the Edmonton Public Library where she is responsible for leading Branch Services, Marketing & Fund Development, Collections & IT and Research & Assessment. Pilar has a broad base of experience in library leadership including: advocacy, collective bargaining, strategic and business planning, recruitment and change leadership. She holds a MLIS from the University of Alberta and a Bachelor of Arts with Honours in English from Acadia University. Pilar was the main champion and leader behind the implementation of EPL’s community-led service framework and the Leading From Any Position staff development initiative. In 2012, Pilar was honoured with the Ken Haycock Award for Promoting Librarianship. Married with two teen-aged boys who bring much joy (mostly), Pilar believes that chocolate solves everything.
Michael Ridley is a librarian at the University of Guelph and an instructor in Guelph’s First Year Seminar Program. He is the former Chief Information Officer (CIO) and Chief Librarian at Guelph. Ridley has served in various executive capacities for CLA, OLA, CAIS, CRKN, and CARL. He is completing a three year term as an elected faculty representative on the Board of Governors at Guelph. Mike tweets as @mridley and blogs on www.MichaelRidley.ca. He can be reached at mridley@uoguelph.ca
Tara Robertson is the Accessibility Librarian at CAPER-BC. She manages alternate format production of textbooks and other course materials for post-secondary students with print disabilities. She also advocates for students with print disabilities and collaborates with other organizations to improve access to accessible materials.
With both an academic and practitioner background, Eileen Gillette has a wide range of experience in community cultural development, cultural planning, cultural policy and cultural sustainability. She worked as a Cultural Policy Analyst at the Creative City Network of Canada focusing on cultural planning, creative cities and the importance of cultural spaces in communities and cities in Canada (2003-2006). In 2006, she was part of three year national research project funded by Infrastructure Canada examining Cultural Infrastructure Development in Canada (2006-2009). She is currently a Divisional Manager of Public Services at Vancouver Island Regional Library and oversees the operations, system-wide programming and personal of 39 library branches on Vancouver Island.

We also welcome Janis Mackenzie, Tamarack Hockin, Jentery Sayers, & Sonia Zagwyn a participants of this lighting talk.

 2:45 – 3:15 pm

Pre-Keynote Pick-me-up and cash bar

Location: Minoru Ballroom

3:15 – 4:30 pm

Closing Keynote Address: Wayde Compton – Diversity and Affect

Location: Minoru Ballroom

Join Wayde Compton as he shares his experience setting out to represent black British Columbian history in literature and public memorial. He will also talk about those who made space for Mr. Compton and others who were trying to do similar work; he will further discuss how diverse representation changes how we are in the world, the nation, the city, and even our own bodies.

Wayde Compton writes poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. He wrote 49th Parallel Psalm, which was nominated for the Dorothy Livesay Prize, and Performance Bond. His latest books are After Canaan: Essays on Race, Writing, and Region, which was a finalist for the City of Vancouver Book Award, and The Outer Harbour: Stories. In addition to writing, Compton co-founded the Hogan’s Alley Memorial Project in 2002, an organization devoted to preserving the public memory of Vancouver’s black community. He is the program director of Creative Writing in Continuing Studies at Simon Fraser University.